World Journal of Dentistry

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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 2 ( July-September, 2010 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Part 2: “I would Rather have a Root Canal than...” Francis W Allen discusses the challenges of cleaning the canal thoroughly to minimize pain and ensure long-term success

Francis W Allen

Citation Information : Allen FW. Part 2: “I would Rather have a Root Canal than...” Francis W Allen discusses the challenges of cleaning the canal thoroughly to minimize pain and ensure long-term success. World J Dent 2010; 1 (2):89-94.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10015-1018

Published Online: 01-09-2010

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2010; The Author(s).


Abstract

The primary objective of root canal therapy is retention of pulpless or pulpally involved tooth with its associated periapical tissues in a healthy state. Achievement of this objective requires that the pulpal spaces and contents be eliminated as sources of infection. No instrumentation technique can be100% effective in removing debris all the time. Although with Light speed technique we can achieve 95% removal of debris, introduction of an antimicrobial endodontic irrigant plays vital role in cleaning up any remaining debris and bacteria that can lead to pain and failure during root canal treatment. With traditional positive pressure irrigation technique getting an adequate amount of irrigant to flow into the last 1mm is not safe and easy. Additionally, techniques recommend 30 or 45 minutes of soaking, which is time consuming. These difficulties can be avoided by novel idea of reversing the irrigation process with EndoVac (discus) by using negative apical pressure for irrigation. SMART endo using light speed technique and endovac irrigation is faster, easier, safer, and can remove 99+% of the debris and bacteria in the critical apical region of the canal. That means less painful, better and more successful root canal treatment.


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