World Journal of Dentistry

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VOLUME 1 , ISSUE 1 ( April-June, 2010 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Part 1: “I would Rather have a Root Canal than...” Francis W Allen discusses the challenges of cleaning the canal thoroughly to minimize pain and ensure long-term success

Francis W Allen

Citation Information : Allen FW. Part 1: “I would Rather have a Root Canal than...” Francis W Allen discusses the challenges of cleaning the canal thoroughly to minimize pain and ensure long-term success. World J Dent 2010; 1 (1):21-29.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10015-1005

Published Online: 01-06-2010

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2010; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Cleaning and shaping of root canal system forms the most important step in root canal root canal therapy. Unfortunately most of the instruments and techniques advocated are unable to remove residual debris and bacteria, ultimately resulting in pain and failure. To eliminate the causes of pain, and ensure success, we must use instruments and employ a technique that can best accomplish proper cleaning and shaping. Virtually all canals have parallel walls, and are curved and oval in shape. Hence tapered instruments are unable to clean the canal effectively and increase the chances of ledges and transportation and extrusion of debris beyond the apex. With the introduction of Light Speed technology primary goal of endodontics which includes removal of debris safely and effectively can be achieved. This article focuses on the use of Light Speed technology to overcome the difficulties posed by the other instrumentation and techniques to achieve debris and bacteria free canal system.


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